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During the Event

Ensure that presenters are aware of Tulane’s commitment to disability – inclusive meetings, and ask them to prepare and deliver their presentations with accessibility in mind. Event planners should be prepared for the possibility that presenters and attendees at your event may also require accommodations. Both should be asked about their access needs in advance of the program.

Event staff should be apprised of the general obligation to provide accommodation for people with disabilities. Staff should be prepared to offer assistance (directions for drop-off and accessible parking, seating, or using the amenities of the building, etc.).

Designate a Point Person:

At larger events or events with scheduled accommodations, designate someone to be responsible for accommodations as well as help with seating, ensuring captioning and other technology is working, maintaining clear pathways, or other needs.

On-Site Registration

Registration workers should be well-informed about how to provide accommodations and where to obtain services. Staff should know the answers to common questions such as:

  • “Do I need a Tulane permit to use an accessible parking space?” (Answer: Yes, between 8:00AM-5:00PM. Accessible day permits are available at Info Booths for a fee. Car owner must have a state accessible permit or obvious temporary disability.)
  • “Where is the accessible restroom and water fountain?”
  • “When traveling around campus, how do I find accessible paths of travel?”
  • “Are there Braille directional signs in the building?”
  • “Will there be a wheelchair or scooter available to use. If not, where can I rent one locally?”

Presentations:

Provide presenters with a checklist requesting that they:

  • Submit materials in advance so that they can be forwarded to individuals who may not be able to view screens or flip charts
  • Verbally describe visual materials (e.g., slides, charts, etc.)
  • Have printed copies available (in larger font)
  • Avoid using small print on presentations that can’t be seen from a distance
  • Ensure speakers (including those asking questions) always use a microphone
  • Activate captions on any video used in the presentation. If a video is not captioned, sign language interpreters or real-time captionists may be needed for access to video content of the meeting
  • Encourage hourly breaks
  • Organize breakout group activities to maximize distance between groups (e.g. each group going to a corner of the room or side rooms).

Have someone onsite who helps to ensure follow-through on all of the above.

Communication Access Needs:

Attendees who require communication access often cannot use the telephone and are able to convey their needs more effectively by email. Attendees should be asked for their preference of communication access and every effort should be made to meet this request.

The primary types of communication access includes the use of an Assistive Listening System (ALS), sign language interpreting or Communication Access in Real Time (CART). ALS devices are available at many large lecture halls on campus and information of their availability should be on display at the event.

If using the services of a sign language interpreter:

  • Provide reserved seating in the front of the event for the attendee and companions.
  • Sign language interpreters should be situated in the front of the room proximate to the speaker and within the sight line of the Deaf attendee so that both the interpreter and speaker can be viewed simultaneously.
  • A spotlight should be on the interpreter if the lighting in the room is dimmed.
  • Provide an advance copy of presentation so that the interpreter will be well prepared to sign any specialized vocabulary and names

If using the services of a CART reporter:

  • CART reporters will require some space for equipment set-up.
  • Reporters using projection equipment should be situated in close proximity to the projection unit.
  • Provide an advance copy of presentation to CART reporter to prepare him/her for any specialized vocabulary and names used in presentation.

If using the Assistive Listening System:

  • Tulane has Assistive Listening Systems in many classrooms and lecture spaces. The speaker must use the transmitter and the listener uses the receiver. This amplifies sound for the listener. Some ALS systems work with the amplification system in the room. Before every program, event planners should test the ALS in advance.
  • Tulane Technology Services can assist with helping you learn how to use the ALS or troubleshoot if the system is not working. Q&A: Make sure to repeat questions posted by audience before responding, especially if there is not a roving microphone available. Presenters or audience members may express confidence that they are loud enough and do not need a microphone. Regardless, ask them to speak into one. Food: Clearly indicate allergens and gluten-free, vegan, vegetarian, or other options.

Q&A:

Make sure to repeat questions posted by audience before responding, especially if there is not a roving microphone available. Presenters or audience members may express confidence that they are loud enough and do not need a microphone. Regardless, ask them to speak into one.

Food:

Clearly indicate allergens and gluten-free, vegan, vegetarian, or other options.

 

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